How to Overcome Dental Anxiety

If you have a fear of going to the dentist then you’re not alone. It’s estimated that one in six adults has a fear of visiting the dentist. This figure reduces to one in ten for children.

The truth is that the figures don’t matter, if you’re anxious about the dentist then you’re going to miss out on the basic treatment you may need to look after your teeth and preserve them for life. That’s why you need to overcome your anxiety. 

 It is worth noting that consistently elevated anxiety levels have been linked with a variety of age-related diseases.  It’s another good reason to overcome your dental anxiety.

Choose The Right Dentist

There is probably more than one dentist in your town or city which means you have a choice regarding which one suits you best. Instead of choosing the one that is the closest take a look at their reputation. You need a dentist that takes pride in their work and puts your needs first, such as Invisalign in Little Bay.

The right dentist will help you to relax and will take t slow with you, allowing you to appreciate each step and overcome your anxiety.

Share Fears

It’s important to share your anxiety. Ideally, you should share it with your partner and with your dentist. Sharing will instantly make you feel better and it will enlist their help in getting you to visit the dentist regularly.

All you have to do is say that you’re worried about visiting the dentist. Your partner or family can then help support you through the process of arranging appointments, etc.

Breathing Exercises

Sharing is beneficial but it won’t necessarily stop your anxiety levels from rising. To help you stay calm it’s time to learn some breathing exercises. These can be as simple as breathing in for a count of three and breathing out for another count of three.

Focusing on your breathing will help you to stay calm and give you something to think about while they’re examining you.

Small Steps

If you haven’t been to the dentist in a long time then you need to take it slow. Small steps are manageable and less likely to increase your anxiety levels.

The first step is simply contacting the dentist and making an appointment. If you can’t face it have a friend do it for you. It can be for in the future, the point is to get something booked.

When the appointment time does arise you’ll want a friend to take you to the dentist and wait there with you. If you keep chatting the whole time it will take you mind off what you’re about to do.

You can even visit the dentist and only sit n the chair, saving the actual treatment for the next time you go. 

There is no right or wrong way to visit the dentist, it’s what suits you best and allows you to feel safe, reducing your anxiety and helping the dental visits to become ‘normal’. 

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